Chris Sergeant

Chris Sergeant

Research Scientist

Chris Sergeant

Lowering a minnow trap into the Bartlett River, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (photo by C. Soiseth)
Phone: (907) 500-4540
Email: christopher.sergeant@umontana.edu

I study how freshwater ecosystems respond to human activities and a dynamic environment. 

My current work includes:

  • Studying the impacts of mining operations on rivers shared between British Columbia and Alaska
  • Developing long-term monitoring plans to assess the health of rivers
  • Collaborating with scientists and other community members to increase the capacity for conducting rigorous consistent science in transboundary watersheds

My fields of technical expertise include freshwater ecology, water quality, hydrology, and Pacific salmon biology. I have a B.S. and M.S. in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences from the University of Washington. Since 2000, I have held fisheries biologist positions in government, private, and non-profit sectors.

I am also currently working toward a PhD in Dr. Jeff Falke's Freshwater Fish Ecology Lab at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. My dissertation explores how shifting thermal and streamflow regimes will impact watersheds bordering the Gulf of Alaska and the salmon that live within them.

See a current list of my publications, technical reports, and outreach materials on ResearchGate.

In October 2019, I co-organized a workshop with Erin Sexton titled, Advancing scientific knowledge of mining impacts on salmonid-bearing watersheds. Products from the workshop are found here. The website will be updated as new products arise.

Due to interest expressed by workshop participants, in October 2020 I completed an overview of recent environmental monitoring efforts related to mining operations in watersheds shared by Alaska and British Columbia. My primary objective was to concisely describe and reference recently collected government data and identify potential information gaps. The data brief can be viewed and downloaded here.

 

 

Mining projects in Alaska-British Columbia watersheds  

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