Summer Program - Courses

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Admission and Credit Info

  • Undergraduate (300/400 level) or Graduate (400 level) credit, or audit
  • Credits transferrable to UM and most colleges/universities
  • Formal admission to UM not required
  • Transfer credits with completed transcript request form
  • To apply for courses FLBS requires: application; $50.00 non-refundable application fee; transcripts (official or unofficial)

Field Course Notice

 Field courses may require you to be:
  • In good physical condition
  • Able to hike up to 10+ miles a day in strenuous conditions at altitude
  • Properly equipped for a great deal of hiking (equipment list)

About FLBS summer course prerequisites

FLBS summer curriculum courses are designed to be affordable and accessible to all students and working professionals, whether in state or out of state, for undergraduate, graduate, or continuing education credit. If any of our courses interest you, contact FLBS with questions or contact the course instructor directly (contact info listed below within the course description).

 

Summer Session Dates: Mon, Jun 25 - Fri, Aug 17, 2018

 

 

Courses at FLBS

Completing your online application as soon as possible will greatly assist FLBS in planning summer session. Early registration is important, as courses may be cancelled based on enrollment numbers on the enrollment review date. Classes are offered to qualified applicants on a first to register basis.

Each course runs all day each scheduled day of its two or four week timeframe. You may register for 1 or up to 5 classes for the summer. Taking a full load over the 8-week session is an efficient way to complete advanced courses during one summer and may qualify you for a scholarship.

Course descriptions and fees are subject to change.

Course Descriptions

Four-Week Courses, M-Th, 8 a.m-5 p.m.; F, 8 a.m.-Noon
(unless otherwise noted)

FIELD ECOLOGY, BIOE 342, Sec. 01, 5 credits

Dates: June 25-July 20, 2018
Instructors: Dr. James Elser, FLBS-UM; Dr. Diana Six, UM

Prerequisites: One semester of college-level biology, chemistry and mathematics (or equivalents); or consent of instructor

Full Course Description / Syllabus | Required Overnight Field Gear

The course provides detailed study and discussion of ecological phenomena, including: behavior and life cycles of organisms; population, community and landscape dynamics; biodiversity and productivity; biophysical processes (e.g., climate change, nutrient cycles, herbivory, predator-prey interactions) and organization (e.g., genomes, ecosystems, biomes, ecoregions) across space (local to global) and time scales; and, ecological economics and human ecology. Natural history observations and ecological principles are used to explain biological patterns, processes, responses and complex interactions as influenced by changing environmental conditions. Lectures build upon the laws of thermodynamics and other unifying principles to present ecology as a key discipline of the natural world and essential to human well being. This course is conducted outdoors regardless of weather, including all lectures and lab exercises, so those ecological phenomena can be examined in real time and real life. All-day and overnight trips, mainly by foot, will be conducted throughout the course, taking students into the full range of aquatic and terrestrial environments near the Biological Station and the adjacent mountain areas, including Glacier National Park. Students are expected to take detailed notes and conduct directed measurements that will require analysis and interpretation through written and oral presentations and written reports edited by the professor. Meets writing requirement.

 To participate in courses at FLBS you must be: in good physical condition; able to hike up to 10+ miles a day in strenuous conditions at altitude; and properly equipped for a great deal of hiking! (see equipment list).

SEMINARS IN ECOLOGY AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, BIOB 494, Sec. 01

Dates: June 25-July 20, 2018
Lecturers/Instructors: Dr. James Elser, FLBS-UM

1 Credit (Credit/No Credit)

This seminar involves presentation and discussion of local environmental issues and problems and is available to students enrolled for the first 4 weeks of summer session in any combination of courses.

Two-Week Courses, M-F, 8 a.m-5 p.m , 3 Credits

ENVIRONMENTAL SENSORS: DESIGNING, BUILDING AND DEPLOYING IN THE FIELD, BIOB 491

Dates: June 25-July 6, 2018
Instructor: Dr. Cody Youngbull, FLBS-UM

Prerequisites: One year of college-level biology, chemistry, and mathematics, and a general ecology course (can be met via BIOE342 Field Ecology at FLBS) or equivalents; or consent of instructor

Full Course Description / Syllabus

This course is designed for engineering and ecology students to learn about and deploy environmental sensors. This course will include instrumentation design/manufacturing and wireless network communications in the field. This is a practical field course in which ecology and engineering students will work in teams selecting from one of three projects for the design and deployment of: 1) An autonomous surface vehicle for profiling lakes, 2a) A real-time river sensor network, 2b) A real-time forest sensor network, 3) An automated water sampling system. Data from the sensors will be collected and used to answer a specific ecological/environmental question.

LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY, BIOE 451, Sec. 01

Dates: July 9-July 20, 2018
Instructor: Dr. Solomon Z. Dobrowski, CFC-UM

Prerequisites: One year of college-level biology, chemistry, and mathematics, and a general ecology course (can be met via BIOE342 Field Ecology at FLBS) or equivalents; or consent of instructor

Full Course Description / Syllabus | Required Overnight Field Gear

The objective of this course is to understand the physical and ecological processes that shape landscapes, how these biological and physical processes interact, and how they are responding to global change. We will examine how plants and animals are distributed across landscapes, how the physical template of the environment shapes species distributions, and how biotic feedbacks can influence the physical environment. We will examine processes of pattern formation in the environment such as disturbance from fire, and how landscape pattern can affect both physical and biological processes. Field trips will underscore concepts and allow data gathering and interpretation by students. Students are introduced to both satellite and airborne remote-sensing tools used in a GIS environment. Students will analyze and interpret spatially explicit data through analyses and oral presentations.

AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY, BIOB 491

Dates: July 9-July 20, 2018
Instructor: Dr. Matthew Church, FLBS-UM

Prerequisites: One year of college-level biology, chemistry, and mathematics, or equivalents; or consent of instructor

Full Course Description / Syllabus

This intensive field course is available to upper-level undergraduate students with interests in environmental microbiology and aquatic ecology and provides a conceptual foundation and experiential field and laboratory training in modern methods in aquatic microbial ecology. Students will explore topics such as physiology and metabolism of aquatic microbes; methods and tools for assessing microbial diversity, biomass, and growth; and the role of microbes in bioelemental cycles. Students will gain hands-on experience with both cultivation-based approaches and cultivation-independent methods for studying environmental microorganisms.

LAKE ECOLOGY, BIOE 453, Sec. 01

Dates: July 23-August 3, 2018
Instructor: Dr. Shawn Devlin, FLBS-UM

Prerequisites: One year of college-level biology, chemistry, and mathematics, and a general ecology course (can be met via BIOE342 Field Ecology at FLBS) or equivalents; or consent of instructor

Full Course Description / Syllabus | Required Overnight Field Gear

The physical, chemical and biological characteristics of lake ecosystems with an emphasis on physical processes of lake circulation and stratification, nutrient loading and cycling, primary and secondary production and food web interactions, and the role of atmospheric and land use/watershed effects on water quality. This course focuses on the functional relationships and productivity of plant and animal assemblages in lakes as regulated by physical, chemical and biotic processes. Fundamental concepts of ecology as they relate to the aquatic environment are emphasized. Limnological principles are presented within the context of regional and landscape spatial scales of Systems Ecology. Students will learn basic and contemporary methods of study in field settings including Flathead Lake, glacial lakes of Glacier National Park, intermontane prairie kettle lakes and nutrient rich lakes. Because this is a field course offered through the Flathead Lake Biological Station, emphasis is directed toward experiential learning and obtaining hands-on examination and characterization of lakes that will serve the student well throughout their career. Written and oral reports of independent studies as directed by the professor are required.

ALPINE ECOLOGY, BIOE 416, Sec. 01

Dates: July 23-August 3, 2018
Instructor: Dr. Wendy Ridenour, UM-Western

Prerequisites: One semester of biology, chemistry, mathematics, and ecology (can be met via BIOE342 Field Ecology at FLBS) or equivalents; or consent of instructor

Full Course Description / Syllabus | Required Overnight Field Gear

Distribution, abundance and life cycles of plants and animals and their unique ecophysiological adaptations to life in the rigorous environments of the high mountains above the timberline, with emphasis on the Crown of the Continent area. Students learn about the distributions of plants and animals and study the processes and interactions that are the foundation to ecology in alpine environments. Substantial emphasis is placed on the processes that organize communities and the global drivers of climate and how those processes affect alpine systems. The class is organized around field trips and data intensive class projects that underscore major concepts and allow training in data gathering, analysis, presentation, and interpretation by students.

 To participate in courses at FLBS you must be: in good physical condition; able to hike up to 10+ miles a day in strenuous conditions at altitude; and properly equipped for a great deal of hiking! (see equipment list).

STREAM ECOLOGY, BIOE 439, Sec. 01

Dates: August 6-August 17, 2018
Instructor: Dr. Bob Hall, FLBS-UM

Prerequisites: One year of college-level biology, chemistry, and mathematics, and a general ecology course (can be met via BIOE342 Field Ecology at FLBS) or equivalents; or consent of instructor

Full Course Description / Syllabus | Required Overnight Field Gear

The biota and ecological processes of running waters with unifying principles and contemporary research approaches. This course focuses on the fundamental concepts of stream/river ecology and the physical, chemical and biological processes that characterize running water ecosystems. Students learn principles, concepts and methods of study in a field setting, and obtain systems. Over 80% of this course is taught in the field at streamside. Written and oral reports of independent or group studies as directed by the professor are required.

ECOLOGY OF FORESTS AND GRASSLANDS, BIOE 458, Sec. 01

Dates: August 6-August 17, 2018
Instructor: Dr. Andrew Larson

Prerequisites: One year of college-level biology; one semester of chemistry, mathematics, and ecology (can be met via BIOE342 Field Ecology at FLBS) or equivalents; or consent of instructor

Full Course Description / Syllabus | Required Overnight Field Gear

Patterns and processes of forests and grasslands of the northern Rocky Mountains in the context of principles of population, community, and ecosystem ecology. This field course emphasizes the interactive biophysical attributes and processes of the forests and intermountain grasslands. Students observe and learn about plant and animal distributions, plant community structure, and behavior including principles of plant ecology, ecophysiology, and plant and animal interactions in these environments. Energy and materials transfer and feedbacks within food webs are used to describe complex interrelationships driving the dynamics of these systems, including both natural and human components as modifiers of system dynamics. Field trips underscore concepts and allow data gathering and interpretation by students.

 To participate in courses at FLBS you must be: in good physical condition; able to hike up to 10+ miles a day in strenuous conditions at altitude; and properly equipped for a great deal of hiking! (see equipment list).

DRONE REMOTE SENSING OF FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS, BIOB 491

Dates: August 6-August 17, 2018
Instructor: Dr. Michael Döering, ZHAW; Diane Whited, FLBS-UM

Prerequisites: Upper level undergraduate students. Prior coursework in GIS is mandatory. (can be met with FORS 250 Introduction to GIS for Forest Management or GPHY 284 Introduction to GIS and Cartography at UM) Knowledge of remote sensing is preferred, but not required.

Full Course Description / Syllabus | Required Overnight Field Gear

This course will introduce students to field-based methods of close range remote sensing in freshwater ecosystems. Students will be gain knowledge of basic spatial analysis through GIS and remote sensing techniques. In addition, students will learn basic application of drones and ADP, two remote sensing instruments of fast growing interest in ecological research and application. The students will learn about the essentials to operate drones and ADPs, the initial post processing of data products and examples how to integrate these data into ecological research and application.

One-Week Courses, M-F, 8 a.m-5 p.m , 1 Credit

FIELD METHODS IN ORNITHOLOGY, BIOB 491

Dates: July 23-July 27, 2018
Instructors: Dr. Erick Greene, UM; Megan Fylling, UM; Anna Noson, UM

Prerequisites: One year of biology; one semester of mathematics or equivalents; or consent of instructor. Students should also have a general knowledge of bird identification.

Full Course Description / Syllabus

This course is a week-long summer field course available to upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students with interests in gaining hands-on and practical skills pertaining to ornithology and wildlife biology. This course is designed for students to gain advanced field skills that are difficult to obtain from within a traditional academic framework. The course will focus on learning practical skills utilized for avian studies such as handling, banding, and extracting birds, taking morpho-measurements, conducting point counts, telemetry, and bioacoustics work. Lectures and in-class discussions will be used to explore topics such as avian survival and productivity; physiology, body condition, and stress hormones; usefulness and applicability of different study methods; life-cycle and molt-cycle of birds; migratory strategies; and avian communication. Field-based work will take place daily and will emphasize an experiential learning environment collecting data across many technical disciplines and discussing applications of those data.

Independent Study, 3-8 Cr.

ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH, BIOE 490

Dates: Mon, Jun 25 - Fri, Aug 17, 2018
Instructor: FLBS Faculty

Prerequisites: *Special approval required for registration*

Description (not available)

Course is graded CR/NCR.

Contact FLBS for more information and to register. Independent research in field ecology through the Advanced Undergraduate Research course is generally associated with an ongoing research project at FLBS.  Projects are mentored by permanent and visiting FLBS faculty.

Formal courses are highly recommended rather than independent research.

 

© 2017 FLBS, UM
updated: 10/10/2017 11:04 am